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Loring Doolittle

Loring Doolittle

Loring Doolittle, known affectionately as “Dooey,” was born in 1928 in Aurora. He grew up in a large family with three brothers and three sisters in the family home on Catherine Ave. Loring excelled at several sports from a young age. He played hockey, lacrosse, and baseball for local teams in Aurora, Newmarket, Maple, and King City. His mother and father attended every local game. His younger siblings looked up to him as a hero. Loring did not like school. He left for good in grade 8 to work at the Sisman Shoe Factory. Loring also had a stutter. In school a teacher ridiculed him telling him he should be quiet until he learned to talk. Later in life as a referee, however, he had no difficulty talking to an audience of several thousand spectators. Despite his dislike of school, he looked up to the school’s principal Dell Babcock. The principal, who also coached hockey, liked Loring and the two had a lifelong friendship. Loring and older brother Gar were very close in both age and ability. The brothers played baseball for both Aurora and Newmarket over the years. At that time, the winning team would pick two of the best players from the defeated local team before going to the Ontario finals. Gar and Loring were often chosen and played together. The two brothers were also chosen to tryout for the pro-ball team in Toronto which was at that time called the Toronto Maple Leafs. Years later Gar joined the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and passed away soon afterwards due to an operation in 1946. His brother’s...
Robert Bain

Robert Bain

Bob Bain was born in 1947 in Niagara Falls Ontario. His father was a basketball coach on an RCAF training base, which is where his parents met. In his youth he played baseball, hockey, and football. In junior hockey he played with future pro hockey player Derick Sanderson. But of all the sports he tried he exceled in basketball. Bob played basketball for his high school team at Stamford Collegiate for several years. His coach there encouraged him to continue his education to the university level, which he did. Bob attended Waterloo Lutheran University (now Laurier University) and played on their basketball team the Golden Hawks. Bob and the team made the national championships three times and won it finally in 1968. After gaining his degree in psychology he moved on to the University of Alberta where he earned a Bachelor’s and then a Master’s in physical education. As a graduate student coaching was now open to him. His first chance came in 1972 when the team’s junior varsity coach took a year off. Bob became coach of the Golden Bears and that season led his team to victory in the Canada West Playoffs. Bob was offered a position at a brand-new physical education program and began as a lecturer at York University in 1973. Within a week he moved up to coach of the basketball team. Before this promotion Bob had considered more education, but never went back because he loved to coach so much. He eventually gained tenure at York and taught in the coaching certificate program. In his career at York, Bob led the Yeomen to...
David Morland IV

David Morland IV

David Morland IV was born in North Bay, Ontario in 1969. The family soon moved to Toronto where David attended Church Street Public School. David played many sports in grade school. He tried everything from wrestling to skiing, but his two passions emerged as hockey and golf. By grade 10 he had to decide between his two passions. Seeing promise in golf, winning a 1986 and 1987 Ontario Golf Association championship, David chose to step off the ice for good. In 1987 David was admitted with a golf scholarship to Kent State University in Ohio. The marketing student tied for 14th in his first university game at the 1987 West Point Invitational. He was also named All-American Honourable Mention in his first year. The next year he made 13th at the M.A.C. Championships and was runner-up for the Mid-American Invitational. In 1989 David placed 3rd at the West Point Intercollegiate and was the only golfer from Kent State to place at the Butler Invitational. In 1990 he placed 11th at the John Hancock All-American College Golf Classic. In his final year David was again named All-American Honourable Mention. Every summer David returned to Aurora where his family lived from 1987 to 1994. In his first summer home he won the Ontario Men’s Better Ball Championship with his father (David Morland III). During his summers in Aurora he worked on the ground crews of local golf clubs. David would work from 6:00am to 3:00pm, take a quick nap, then practice at the course until nightfall. After graduation in 1991 David turned pro on the 1992 Canadian Tour. That year he...
Paolina Allan

Paolina Allan

Paolina Allan was born in Toronto in 1970. At the age of 7 she moved with family to live in Scotland. Growing up she was always sporty. She was not interested in team sports preferring instead independent running, cycling, and gymnastics. After returning to Canada at age 20 she cycled everywhere she went. As she did not get her driver’s licence until age 35. It was at age 30 after watching the Ironman World Championship on TV that her career as a triathlete began. She saw the father-son Team Hoyt competing and was inspired to race, saying to herself “I want to do that.” In her first race after 1999 she came 4th in her age group. “I was not an athlete. I worked immensely at my training” -Paolina Allan Paolina was supported in her triathlon career by a great network of people at the Aurora Triathlon Team. She was pushed hard by the competitiveness of the 250 members. Not a strong swimmer she was able to develop as a swimmer under her coaches Adam and Nancy. She also swam with fellow Aurora Sports Hall of Famer Dan Thompson. Paolina also took part in the local cycling community with the Newmarket Eagles Cycling Club. A community she is still involved with as a board member and founder/coach of the group’s all women’s branch the eGALS. In 2005, Paolina got her pro licence and was able to race professionally. In her first year she came second in the Ironman Canada Triathlon. In her career she qualified for the Ironman World Championship in Hawaii three times and ran in 2008 and...
Dan Thompson

Dan Thompson

Dan Thompson, was born in 1956 in East York, Ontario. Dan’s late father, a radio broadcaster, and his mom the athlete of the family, inspired him to search for something that he was passionate about. He stumbled on it by accident while coming off the golf course at the Donalda Golf and Country Club. The Club’s life guard, Olympian Jim Shaw, uttered these life changing words, “We need some help swimming against Bayview, and can you swim a few races?” This chance conversation changed the course of his life. As well as participating in his first swim meet, Dan was invited to join a swim club, called SwimTec. Despite his late start into the swimming world, Dan trained under Jim Shaw, Nick Thierry, and one of the great Canadian technical coaches, Howard Firby. Together these coaches helped Dan develop his impeccable Butterfly-stroke technique. At 16, Dan was older than most novice competitors He needed to dedicate his first few years to master the strokes, gain much needed endurance and develop a sense for the water. Another key factor to Dan’s success was his fitness club instructor, Czechoslovakian Team Weight Lifter Vlad Cherpa. Vlad took Dan under his wing and put him through rigorous technical weight training for that summer. He transformed Dan’s physical strength giving him a tremendous amount of power in the water. In the late 70’s and early 80’s, Dan Thompson held the Canadian record in the 100 metre Butterfly. Placing 6th in the 1976 Canadian Olympic Swimming trials gave him the determination to train harder. He broke on the scene in 1977 as a butterfly specialist,...

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