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James “Jim” Clark

James “Jim” Clark

James “Jim” Frederick Clark was born in Midland, Ontario on April 21, 1957. One of his earliest memories of golf is truly out of this world. When he was twelve years old in July 1969, and the world was glued to the television watching the Apollo 11 mission, Jim and his father stepped out for some air and played an evening round of golf at the Midland Golf and Country Club. As the sun was setting, they stared up at the glowing moon in amazement, and disbelief, that there were humans that had earlier that day landed on its surface. Like the rest of the world, the Clark family got up in the middle of the night to witness Neil Armstrong’s historic first step. Jim never considered himself to be an avid, or a very skilled golfer, but he was always a fan of the PGA Tour and the sport of Curling. In 1976, he was part of the Curling Team that won the Ontario Colts Championship. In 2002, that team was inducted into the Midland Ontario Sports Hall of Fame. Little did Jim know that his love of curling would bring him closer to the PGA Tour action. After University, Jim moved to Toronto to work in the computer industry and would often attend the Canadian Open at Glen Abbey as a fan. One day, while curling, Jim met a man by the name of Brian Petrie who was wearing a Canadian Open Committee shirt. Brian invited Jim to volunteer at the upcoming Canadian Open, but due to scheduling conflicts, Jim had to decline. In 1984, a couple...
David “Dave” Gardner and Ryan Gardner

David “Dave” Gardner and Ryan Gardner

David “Dave” Calvin Gardner and Ryan Robert Gardner, follow in the footsteps of Cal Gardner – their father and grandfather respectively. The three generations have left their mark on the sport of Ice Hockey, both nationally and internationally. Cal Gardner, a hockey legend in his own right, played for the Toronto Maple Leafs, winning the Stanley Cup twice. His son, Dave Gardner, was born in Toronto on August 23, 1952. From an early age, it was obvious that Dave would follow in his father, Cal’s, footsteps. He grew up playing minor hockey in Leeside and in 1970 he was drafted to the OHA by the Peterborough Pete’s. Dave quickly moved to the Toronto Marlboros where he had an outstanding rookie season scoring 137 points in 62 games. That year he was the recipient of the Red Tilson Trophy, awarded annually to the most outstanding player in the league. Dave’s professional hockey career began in 1972 when he was drafted 8th overall to the Montreal Canadians. He was then traded to the St. Louis Blues where he played 23 games and scored 9 points. Midway through the 1974-75 season, Dave was traded to the California Golden Seals (who later became the Cleveland Barons) where he played 289 games and scored 166 points. During his time with the club, Dave had four consecutive seasons where he scored at least 16 goals per season. While in the NHL, Dave played 348 games and scored a total of 188 points. In 1980, Dave accepted an offer to play in Europe with the Swiss 2nd division Ambri Piotta hockey team, beginning a new chapter...
Travis Romagnoli

Travis Romagnoli

Travis Lawrence Romagnoli was born in Newmarket, Ontario on June 2, 1976. From a young age, Travis showed tremendous talent as a multi-sport athlete. He loved hockey and played for the Aurora Minor Hockey Association where he was appointed Captain of both the Novice and Atom A Rep teams. In 1988, he received the prestigious “Player of the Game” award during the Major Atom Tournament. Hockey was not the only sport that Travis gravitated toward; he swam competitively as a member of the Aurora Swim Club and played minor rep soccer with the Aurora Youth Soccer Club. In 1986, Travis further expanded his athleticism when he turned to gymnastics as an off-season conditioning activity for hockey. He was immediately hooked. For two years, he juggled both hockey and gymnastics until it became too demanding. It was clear that he had a choice to make, and he decided to concentrate on gymnastics, unsure where it would lead him. After deciding to focus exclusively on gymnastics, Travis saw near immediate success; at the 1989 Tyro National Championships, he won Gold All-Around, setting the record for highest score earning 111.5 out of a possible 120 points. That same year, he won the Town of Aurora Civic Award for his outstanding achievements. In 1990, Travis competed at the Junior Pan Am Games and won gold in Pommel Horse and bronze in Floor, Rings and All-Around. From 1991 to 1993, Travis trained at TN Academy in Concord under Coach Masaki Naosaki and Coach Hiroshi Shimosaki. Multiple clubs trained within the same facility and the overlap meant that Travis received guidance from a variety of...
Reginald “Reg” Chappell

Reginald “Reg” Chappell

Reginald “Reg” Chappell was born in Windsor on August 26, 1947. To say that he was drawn to the water from a young age would be an understatement; when he was three years old, he had to be tied to a picnic table because he refused to stay out of the deep water! One of Reg’s earliest memories is pretending to swim in the backseat of the car while his dad was driving. He would pretend to dive and propel though the ditches and culverts as the car drove by. All Reg wanted to do was be in the water, but the family could not afford swimming lesson until he was twelve years old. In 1962, when he was in grade nine, Reg was asked to coach the Herman Collegiate Institute High School dive team. This was the beginning of his coaching career and he continued to coach the high school dive team through university. Reg also joined the high school swim team and his coach, Keith Buckley, inspired, motivated and guided him both athletically and academically. In 1966, the swim team won the High School Championship and Reg shared the Individual Senior Championship award with a fellow teammate. When Coach Buckley left the school, Reg felt the absence of his positive influence both on the deck and in the classroom. He went on to fail grade twelve twice, and found a job at a local factory where he worked for four years while completing high school through correspondence courses. In 1969, after the passing of his mother, Reg fulfilled her wishes for him to return to school and...
Loring Doolittle

Loring Doolittle

Loring Doolittle, known affectionately as “Dooey,” was born in 1928 in Aurora. He grew up in a large family with three brothers and three sisters in the family home on Catherine Ave. Loring excelled at several sports from a young age. He played hockey, lacrosse, and baseball for local teams in Aurora, Newmarket, Maple, and King City. His mother and father attended every local game. His younger siblings looked up to him as a hero. Loring did not like school. He left for good in grade 8 to work at the Sisman Shoe Factory. Loring also had a stutter. In school a teacher ridiculed him telling him he should be quiet until he learned to talk. Later in life as a referee, however, he had no difficulty talking to an audience of several thousand spectators. Despite his dislike of school, he looked up to the school’s principal Dell Babcock. The principal, who also coached hockey, liked Loring and the two had a lifelong friendship. Loring and older brother Gar were very close in both age and ability. The brothers played baseball for both Aurora and Newmarket over the years. At that time, the winning team would pick two of the best players from the defeated local team before going to the Ontario finals. Gar and Loring were often chosen and played together. The two brothers were also chosen to tryout for the pro-ball team in Toronto which was at that time called the Toronto Maple Leafs. Years later Gar joined the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and passed away soon afterwards due to an operation in 1946. His brother’s...

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